Human Rights and
International Democratic Solidarity

PUBLICATIONS

The Day Mr. K died

International customs, Buenos Aires airport, Argentina, noon, october 27. I turn on my cell phone and the message "Kirchner dead" appears. It takes me a while to fully grasp it, and when I do, I look around and begin to feel a mixture of tense calm and bewilderment among the customs officials. A lot of things run through my head during these minutes. It had been a long time since I had felt this particular sense of contained crisis that I have experienced so many times in this country.

Argentina: Cyclical Setbacks in a Movementist Society

  • By Eduardo Viola y Héctor Ricardo Leis
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On probation: the release of political prisoners in Cuba

Immediately one can listen to the optimistic readings on political changes in Cuba, as if ignoring the repressive regime's skill to hold in power for more than half a century. However, so long as first generation human rights are considered a crime, nothing will change in that country and those who are being released can be sent back to prison anytime.

Antes que amanezca y otros relatos (Before dawn and other stories)

  • By Jorge Olivera Castillo
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Democracy, Markets & Transparency 2009

  • By Gabriel C. Salvia y Hernán Alberro
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Our Hapless Man in Havana

For a month, Cuba has detained a USAID contractor for passing out laptops. It's time for the U.S. to send over a whole lot more.

 

Premio a la Diplomacia Comprometida en Cuba 2009-2010

  • By CADAL
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The Day Mr. K died

International customs, Buenos Aires airport, Argentina, noon, october 27. I turn on my cell phone and the message "Kirchner dead" appears. It takes me a while to fully grasp it, and when I do, I look around and begin to feel a mixture of tense calm and bewilderment among the customs officials. A lot of things run through my head during these minutes. It had been a long time since I had felt this particular sense of contained crisis that I have experienced so many times in this country.

On probation: the release of political prisoners in Cuba

Immediately one can listen to the optimistic readings on political changes in Cuba, as if ignoring the repressive regime's skill to hold in power for more than half a century. However, so long as first generation human rights are considered a crime, nothing will change in that country and those who are being released can be sent back to prison anytime.

Our Hapless Man in Havana

For a month, Cuba has detained a USAID contractor for passing out laptops. It's time for the U.S. to send over a whole lot more.

 

Argentina: Cyclical Setbacks in a Movementist Society

  • By Eduardo Viola y Héctor Ricardo Leis
Read

Democracy, Markets & Transparency 2009

  • By Gabriel C. Salvia y Hernán Alberro
Read
 

Antes que amanezca y otros relatos (Before dawn and other stories)

  • By Jorge Olivera Castillo
Read