Human Rights and
International Democratic Solidarity

PUBLICATIONS

The European Union, Cuba and Human Rights

Without a Cuban gesture towards a more open political system, it does not make sense to discuss an agreement since the one party regime of Raúl Castro would not approve any improvement in the area of human rights. Thus, the negotiations between the EU and Cuba started rather poorly if we believe there was ever any genuine interest by the EU in achieving any progress regarding a more open political system in the island.

A Too Big Reward for China

The perception that China rewards loyalty is wrong. Not only is it doubtful that kowtowing to China will bring short-term benefits but, on the contrary, it is rather quite possible that we’ll end up paying a high price for such policy in the future. If today’s decisions are shaping our future, then granting China with market economy status will surely be a nail in the coffin for Argentina.

Venezuela bajo la Revolución Bolivariana: Medios de Comunicación y Libertad de Expresión (Venezuela under the Bolivarian Revolution: Media and Freedom of Expression)

  • By Andrés Cañizález
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Fidel Castro and the Integrity of Estela de Carlotto in the Defence of Human Rights

(Infobae) A human rights figure cannot be indifferent towards human rights violations that take place in the remaining dictatorships nor they can ignore such evident facts to defend the indefensible.

Human Rights Defended by Dictatorships?

(Latin America Goes Global) Recently, a third of the members of the UN Human Rights Council were renewed with China, the biggest dictatorship in the world, accumulating no less than 180 votes which gives proof to the assumption that several developed democracies voted in China's favour.

Human Rights before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall

  • By Günter Nooke
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Dealing with the authoritarian resurgence

  • By Christopher Walker
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Cuba, the remnant dictatorship in Latin America

However, despite the objective fact that Cuba is not a democracy because it established a one-party system and therefore its authorities do not win free and fair elections with competition there is so much evidence of the repressive features of their regime that is documented in its own Constitution, Criminal Law, Special laws and decisions of the People's Courts - all denounced by the most prestigious international human rights organizations such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch - therefore drawing attention that in Latin America the government of the Castro brothers is not seen for what it evidently is: a dictatorship.

The more things change in Cuba’s external relations, the more they remain the same in its domestic politics

  • By Armando Chaguaceda y Ted A. Henken
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Burundi ante su segundo Examen Periódico Universal en el Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU

  • By Diana Arévalo
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Belarús ante su segundo Examen Periódico Universal en el Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU

  • By Diana Arévalo
Read
 

The European Union, Cuba and Human Rights

Without a Cuban gesture towards a more open political system, it does not make sense to discuss an agreement since the one party regime of Raúl Castro would not approve any improvement in the area of human rights. Thus, the negotiations between the EU and Cuba started rather poorly if we believe there was ever any genuine interest by the EU in achieving any progress regarding a more open political system in the island.

A Too Big Reward for China

The perception that China rewards loyalty is wrong. Not only is it doubtful that kowtowing to China will bring short-term benefits but, on the contrary, it is rather quite possible that we’ll end up paying a high price for such policy in the future. If today’s decisions are shaping our future, then granting China with market economy status will surely be a nail in the coffin for Argentina.

Fidel Castro and the Integrity of Estela de Carlotto in the Defence of Human Rights

(Infobae) A human rights figure cannot be indifferent towards human rights violations that take place in the remaining dictatorships nor they can ignore such evident facts to defend the indefensible.

Human Rights Defended by Dictatorships?

(Latin America Goes Global) Recently, a third of the members of the UN Human Rights Council were renewed with China, the biggest dictatorship in the world, accumulating no less than 180 votes which gives proof to the assumption that several developed democracies voted in China's favour.

Cuba, the remnant dictatorship in Latin America

However, despite the objective fact that Cuba is not a democracy because it established a one-party system and therefore its authorities do not win free and fair elections with competition there is so much evidence of the repressive features of their regime that is documented in its own Constitution, Criminal Law, Special laws and decisions of the People's Courts - all denounced by the most prestigious international human rights organizations such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch - therefore drawing attention that in Latin America the government of the Castro brothers is not seen for what it evidently is: a dictatorship.

 

Human Rights before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall

  • By Günter Nooke
Read

Dealing with the authoritarian resurgence

  • By Christopher Walker
Read

The more things change in Cuba’s external relations, the more they remain the same in its domestic politics

  • By Armando Chaguaceda y Ted A. Henken
Read
 

Venezuela bajo la Revolución Bolivariana: Medios de Comunicación y Libertad de Expresión (Venezuela under the Bolivarian Revolution: Media and Freedom of Expression)

  • By Andrés Cañizález
Read